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91
Movies, TV, Books & Music / Re: Twin Peaks Returns
« Last post by Eluvei on September 09, 2017, 07:01:01 PM »
Anyway, that's the best postmortem I've read, not that the competition is great ("it's about the show and ending and stuff!");

Yeah, very refreshing to read an interpretation that actually tries to solve the mystery, and I don't know how he managed to put that together so cohesively this quickly.

Quote
these are about the only other two I liked, but they focused more on what Lynch was saying rather than what was technically happening, echoing your conversation with Nightcrawler that I didn't feel quite comfortable wading into (the second article in particular touches on a lot of the same themes you debated with Nighty and obviously comes away with a more positive interpretation):

https://www.vox.com/culture/2017/9/3/16250822/twin-peaks-finale-recap-part-17-18-the-return

http://www.avclub.com/twin-peaks-gave-us-a-moving-meditation-on-death-1800661325

Thanks, pretty good articles, the AV Club one got me kinda :judo:.

I defended the "happy" scenes throughout the show as sincere, but as I said earlier, I had trouble believing this also applied to the goofy battle against BOB. It was too insane for me to take as anything other than at least some kind of dream, and Cooper's superimposed face showing up appeared to confirm it. But when I read the guy in the AV Club article saying "meta" isn't in Lynch's vocabulary, it reminded me of a thing from an old article I read earlier this year:

Lynch is often embraced as an ironist. He can appear to be laughing at the all-American innocents and celebrating the tawdry and amoral. But I'm beginning to realise that isn't the case. Lynch despises irony and cruelty, and loves those wide-eyed idealists who believe in love and purity. At a screening of the new movie at the National Film Theatre, a beautiful scene is played from Blue Velvet in which Laura Dern's Sandy describes her vision of love. "I had a dream. In the dream there was our world and the world was dark because there weren't any robins, and the robins represented love. And for the longest time there was just this darkness and all of a sudden thousands of robins were set free and they flew down and brought this blinding light of love. And it seemed that love was the only thing that would make any difference." The critic Mark Kermode, interviewing Lynch on stage, says what he loves about this scene is that it is so sincerely felt, despite the fact that so many in the audience laugh and regard it as ironic goofball.

Lynch nods, and brilliantly deconstructs the kind of audience who admire him for what he considers to be the wrong reasons. "A shared experience in the theatre is very different from seeing a film on your own, and in a theatre we all have this thing where we want to be very cool, and when you see something like this, kind of really embarrassing, the tendency is to laugh, because you are saying out loud that you realise this is embarrassing and not cool and you're hip to the scene, so this kind of thing happens. And then we also know, when we are alone with this person we're falling in love with, we do say goofy things, but we don't have a problem with it; it's so beautiful. And the other person is forgiving for these beautiful, loving, goofy things. There's a truth to the scene."
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Character Cove / Re: Why Does Puck Change Appearance?
« Last post by MrFlibble on September 09, 2017, 06:25:26 PM »
Puck says "fuck you" to the confines of reality. He'll reference popular culture from outside his universe, because he doesn't give a shit.
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Character Cove / Re: Why Does Puck Change Appearance?
« Last post by JK17 on September 09, 2017, 05:07:42 PM »
This pretty much sums it up.

Puck isn't a shape-shifter, Miura simply changes the way he is depicted depending on the situation. This is a well-known type of Japanese caricature called "super deformed". It's typically used to underline comical circumstances.

And it's not limited to Puck in Berserk, it's applied to other characters as well, like Ivalera, Isidro and a bunch of others. Even Guts & Casca have had little caricatural depictions before. Puck is the most recognizable because he's by far the one who's most featured in that way and also because of his unique design (of which both variations are chestnut-themed).

Oh okay, that makes more sense now. And I'm new to Manga, so this was the first time I've seen such a thing. I appreciate your understanding and patience. And I do remember when specifically Isidro looked more comical like from those cartoon comics in newspapers, lol. I probably should have correlated this, but I've got a lot on my brain. Anyway, thanks again.
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Character Cove / Re: Why Does Puck Change Appearance?
« Last post by Aazealh on September 09, 2017, 01:55:06 PM »
My take on this is that Puck is not actually changing form, but that Miura simply chooses to present him to us in the way that suits the occasion (though I don't have much to back up my opinion).

This pretty much sums it up.

Puck isn't a shape-shifter, Miura simply changes the way he is depicted depending on the situation. This is a well-known type of Japanese caricature called "super deformed". It's typically used to underline comical circumstances.

And it's not limited to Puck in Berserk, it's applied to other characters as well, like Ivalera, Isidro and a bunch of others. Even Guts & Casca have had little caricatural depictions before. Puck is the most recognizable because he's by far the one who's most featured in that way and also because of his unique design (of which both variations are chestnut-themed).
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Character Cove / Re: Why Does Puck Change Appearance?
« Last post by m on September 09, 2017, 01:37:34 PM »

My take on this is that Puck is not actually changing form, but that Miura simply chooses to present him to us in the way that suits the occasion (though I don't have much to back up my opinion).
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Character Cove / Why Does Puck Change Appearance?
« Last post by JK17 on September 09, 2017, 01:19:01 PM »
I've tried searching but I can't seem to find anything, whether it is here on this forum or anywhere else. And I ask to not be so hard on me if this is a stupid question: Why does Puck's physical form change from a typical small humanoid fairy to a puffy almost Moogle final fantasy like? I've read the entire series (currently re-reading again) and there's no explanation. Is Puck literally changing their physical appearance or some sort of illusion for the reader or something.

Again, sorry if this is a stupid question, but it's been bugging me!
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Current Episodes / Re: Episode 346
« Last post by Griffith on September 09, 2017, 07:50:25 AM »
My first thought (which I still hold) is that he decided to style them after the original "Puck Knight" picture, just for the reference.

Agreed, it's a pretty iconic shot of Puck from its time, so it's a nice and natural callback to make.
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Creation Station / Re: Griff's Colors
« Last post by Griffith on September 09, 2017, 06:22:56 AM »
Threw this idea about the many faces of Cooper together as a gag after the end of Twin Peaks: The Return *SPOILERS*, but then went back and kind of spruced it up enough to be an avatar and toss it in here (there's still a few things that could be better, so I may add or improve more details, but in that case I'll just stealth reupload):


The idea is based on the many sides of Cooper we see over the course of Twin Peaks ala the five faces of Shiva in Hindu art. Here's the base source image, preferred for its Peaky background as well as the viability to more easily photoshop Coopers on it. From left to right: Cooper as "Dougie Jones," the Dougie Jones Tupla, Special Agent Dale Cooper, Richard, and Mr. C the evil Cooper doppelganger. Additions to the rest of the image include Laura Palmer superimposed above them (I should have superimposed a giant image of Cooper's face over the whole thing =), the key to Coop's room at the Great Northern in his lap as he sits on blue "rose" petals on top of a skinned owl, and he holds in his hands a golden shovel, a slice of cherry pie, the log, and no doubt a cup of damn fine coffee. He's also wearing a ring you might recognize.
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Current Episodes / Re: Episode 346
« Last post by Aazealh on September 09, 2017, 05:41:19 AM »
Yep, either that initial image was based on canon Elf Knight lore or it's the life in the art imitating the art in the art. My favorite possibility though is Miura just had the same idea twice independently when it came to designing the armor of the Elvin guards. More likely he just couldn't get it out of his head because it's pretty neat, and of course he uses similarly styled "armor" in Gigantomakhia.

My first thought (which I still hold) is that he decided to style them after the original "Puck Knight" picture, just for the reference.
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Current Episodes / Re: Episode 346
« Last post by Griffith on September 09, 2017, 05:37:49 AM »
Yep, either that initial image was based on canon Elf Knight lore or it's the life in the art imitating the art in the art. My favorite possibility though is Miura just had the same idea twice independently when it came to designing the armor of the Elvin guards. More likely he just couldn't get it out of his head because it's pretty neat, and of course he uses similarly styled "armor" in Gigantomakhia.
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