What are you watching? (television thread)

Griffith

With the streak of a tear, Like morning dew
That's Saul, Folks! -

Really liked the episode. One thing that really stood out to me was the Kim flashback scene when they are signing the papers, I was honestly waiting for a look on Saul's face of maybe sadness and regret as Kim walks out the door, but no, at this point he's completely Saul Goodman not a shred of Jimmy is in there, and Kim knows he's no longer the man she knew.

I think the closest we got was the look on his face before he had her sent in, but even that was a bit enigmatic. Otherwise, yeah, he was a complete prick.

For some reason during the episode i was expecting an accidental death of one of the characters I guess that's a bit cliché, like Marion slipping and breaking her neck.

Hey, it's not a bad thing to consider the unexpected to happen on this show.

But Gene is really unhinged at this point, he was about to hurt that guy with the dog's ashes and he had murderous intent with Marion, really interesting, I think he's having an identity crisis too, he's definitely not an evil person to me, I knew he wouldn't directly murder someone maybe indirectly but he'd never strangle someone to death for example.

Well, I guess it depends on your point of view at this juncture; was that moment of pause when he let Marion push the life alert the kindness of an ultimately good man, or just the weakness of truly a bad one?

The message of the last few episodes has been the opposite of a redemption story, more a story of the unredeemable. Like this guy potentially had some kind of greatness inside him, but when the chips were down always reverted to slippin' Jimmy or Saul Goodman. He was even doing the Saul hands at the phone, and basically treating Jeff and Marion like he was his old untouchable criminal-lawyer self.

This is all in response to the phone call though, so maybe this is his way of turning himself in, but going on a Saul spree first and seeing how long he can get away with it before he gets caught. I like how for all his slickness he was ultimately just an awful criminal here though; assaulting an old woman in her home! What an ignominious end.

Also did everyone notice how monotonous and basic Kim's life became, even how she gave basic answers to everything

It was worse than that, she was basically passively agreeable to everything, even if it was moronic. Like her boyfriend with his miracle whip, yups and Outback, both a simple, "good man" and completely beneath her, perfect for her purgatory where she just goes along with these Florida yokels (no offense to any Floridians =) and does her shitty sprinkler copy-writing job with completely unnecessary rigor.

Now after her confession nothing is really weighing her down anymore so I'm interested to see if we'll see her again or if her story is concluded. I have a suspicion she will meet with Saul again in person I think just talking on the phone isn't the end of it.

Oh yeah, I definitely think we need a post-Gene resolution here. They'll meet again.

Maybe she'll testify against him or vice versa, since now there IS going to be a corroborating party to her affidavit, so maybe they'll go to prison together for framing Howard and working with the cartel; happy ending! My only question is does the show end with Jimmy in prison for life or is there still an afterlife here? Do we see 70 year old Jimmy try to make good with Kim? :ganishka:

It would be full circle if she basically came to visit him like Chuck, since she, like Chuck before her, wants him to face the consequences. If he does that, and finally recognizes he's the problem, can he then have a life after? Or would he then just be a schnook like Henry Hill? He kind of already rejected that life with Gene, but maybe that's because he couldn't live with the lie, or without her, after Kim called him out.

BTW, the Jesse/Kim scene was a nice surprise since they're the most morally aligned by the end of their arcs, and it kind of fully establishes her existence as a contemporary in the Bad universe.

Doing the right thing was Kim's way of "breaking bad."

Well, it's my old joke title for this show, Breaking Good, but I was looking at the wrong character.

Kind of bummed that due to how much screen time they gave Gene fumbling around, we're left with just one episode to wrap absolutely everything up.

Strongly disagree; Gene is Saul ascended to final form and the coolest shit since Heisenberg; he's basically Saul on a Walt-like bender, completely off the chain, practically strangling old comedy icons! When he did the fucking Saul fingers over the phone I lost it. Muah, magnifico. This IS the absolutely everything wrapping up. Also, unlike most ensembles, they really only have two characters left that need any wrapping, it's already a wrap for everyone else at this point. :carcus:

I think what I'm still missing, now that we're absolutely in the home stretch, is what actually happened to Jimmy internally after he and Kim broke up. The heartlessness we ultimately see him embrace once he's splurged his Sandpiper money on his shitty McMansion is not where we last saw that character—when Kim says she and he aren't good for each other. So that when we get to that divorce papers scene, they've edited around what should have been the downward spiral of a broken man. Instead, we got the jump-cut version where it's just "Broken Man, enter stage right."

I can rationalize it myself, (without Kim, and without Chuck, there's nothing holding his bad instincts back), but it's not satisfying.

The rub to me is that, if anything, they showed too much work in six seasons and not enough solutions until now, so it seems disproportionate. We didn't get "the Saul show" until like season 5, or arguably 4 episodes from the finish! Then after 6+ years of slow burn character work, we get one scene to cover the break-up precipitating his fall and there's not even any aftermath of it until this episode. Fundamentally though, I think it's all fine, but it's incongruent with the pace and rigor of the previous seasons, perhaps for the better though. In my estimation the show has drastically improved the last two to three seasons, and these episodes have me more excited than anything this group has made since the last days of Bad. So I'm finding it very satisfying if a little off-kilter (but like I said, I don't mind it).

I recognize that if this were Berserk, it's where Griff-Aazealh would tell me to re-read the series, because all the components are probably there, scattered around. And I suppose the problem I have with that is that I don't intend to re-watch this series. I've really found it all pretty boring, a few highlights aside. Some great acting, a few fun characters (Lalo is memorable, to me).

Yeah, lord no, I could barely get through the "early going" (seasons 1-3? =) the first time, and I wouldn't even wanna watch BB again and that's like a roller coaster ride compared to this show. But that's part of the reason I'm loving this; they have nothing left to burn slowly. Continuing your analogy though, you're basically a Guts' Band truther when it comes to Gene, "I hate these women and children RUINING the revengeance!" :troll:

But right now I'm more interested in if it's just me that feels they fudged the math a bit on how Jimmy truly adds up to Saul.

Like I said, objectively it's fine, better even, just not consistent with the endless math that came before it. They basically did advanced calculous for 5 seasons only to ultimately show us that two plus two indeed equals four. I also think they've now changed the equation though, at least from how I previously perceived the show: it's not about Jimmy becoming Saul, it's the revelation that Jimmy was always Saul underneath, and he's just been getting worse, not set up for redemption or a return to being good ole Jimmy. The whole "he's really a sweet guy with a heart of gold underneath" narrative was the ruse, not Saul Goodman. This was actually a pretty good long con!
 
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Doing the right thing was Kim's way of "breaking bad."

Kind of bummed that due to how much screen time they gave Gene fumbling around, we're left with just one episode to wrap absolutely everything up.

I think what I'm still missing, now that we're absolutely in the home stretch, is what actually happened to Jimmy internally after he and Kim broke up. The heartlessness we ultimately see him embrace once he's splurged his Sandpiper money on his shitty McMansion is not where we last saw that character—when Kim says she and he aren't good for each other. So that when we get to that divorce papers scene, they've edited around what should have been the downward spiral of a broken man. Instead, we got the jump-cut version where it's just "Broken Man, enter stage right."

I can rationalize it myself, (without Kim, and without Chuck, there's nothing holding his bad instincts back), but it's not satisfying.

I recognize that if this were Berserk, it's where Griff-Aazealh would tell me to re-read the series, because all the components are probably there, scattered around. And I suppose the problem I have with that is that I don't intend to re-watch this series. I've really found it all pretty boring, a few highlights aside. Some great acting, a few fun characters (Lalo is memorable, to me). But right now I'm more interested in if it's just me that feels they fudged the math a bit on how Jimmy truly adds up to Saul.
BCS was always a bit boring, not gonna lie. Most people ran away when the law episodes got more complex as the first seasons progressed... I mean, I really like what we got so far (in the entire series), but these last two episodes have been bad to me, mostly because the tone went too dark too fast. I really liked Nippy for example, felt like a great conclusion even, but these two? I just don't want to rewatch them, cameos and all (these were ehhh. Even the Koyama cameo that laster for a couple ended up being the best one.) They have good parts, but overall, feel weak for a final season that started really well, unless they are saving the last tweeest for the end the show will probably only end in dark note and that's it.
 
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