Author Topic: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition  (Read 58956 times)

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Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #75 on: November 18, 2009, 10:20:04 PM »
Oh, so both Yoshiokas show up. I was afraid Deshichiro wouldn't, because he doesn't say anything to show up in the translation.

Yeah, and it is sort of funny that what they both have to say, total, is, "Hi."

That Munisai portion is very beautiful, one of the best so far. But I wonder if he really calls him Musashi, or is it Takezo? In the end, did he talk to him as one who acknowledges him living by the sword, or as a father?

Yeah, that could be an important distinction in this case, and I wondered about it as well when I read it. Earlier in the translation it does make that distinction with Otsu calling him Takezo, so I can only assume this was consistent, and accurate, with that, or that it could truly be taken either way.

Anyway, thank you for these wonderful posts, the pictures you posted are all the ones I desperately wanted to see. I couldn't possibly think of anything else to ask of you. Boy, we'll have plenty to discuss from now on!

I hope so, I think there's a lot of ground to cover yet on the discussion front. Anyway, I'll also be posting some more photos now and then, just little things of interest, and probably the sequence with Inshun if people want to see that?

And is it just me, or is anyone else now looking even more forward to the next episodes after we've seen all of this?

Yes, this has taken it all to another level. Take Inoue's words from 2008, which bear review:

"I thought "The LAST Manga Exhibition" could become an
opportunity for me, to turn the "Musashi" I depicted and
his lifetime of killing dozens of people into a positive, despite
everything.

What I'm trying to say is--

The people that read "Vagabond" all along.
The people that accepted my many twists and turns during
these 10 years, and kept following me.
I really, really wanted to make them feel good.
"I'm glad I kept reading." --
I absolutely wanted to make them feel that way.

Drawing "shadows" to draw "light."
Conflicts and killing people are "shadows."
I thought I had to draw that side, or I wouldn't be able to see
the "light."
I thought that was what I was proceeding towards.

However, even if it was something along the path to my
destination, the pictures that depict killing people, although
pictures, also had the power to unconciously hurt people's
hearts.
Unseen thorns were left remaining in the reader and the
artist.
When I discovered a part of myself that felt, I don't want to
show these to people that still have God-like, bare open souls,
like young children, I felt this was a certainty.

I'm glad I was able to draw this story at this time.
No, it had to be this time, and it had to be a "Manga drawn
in space, experienced with one's entire body," or it really
wouldn't have been possible to get across.

I now truly feel that I finally had an opportunity to depict
"light" itself.
When I think so, it all wasn't a mistake. It turned into the
exact form I was proceeding to.

Even when I depict sorrow, it is no longer sorrow without a
destination.

July 2008
Inoue Takehiko"

It reads in part like a eulogy for the series, yet that's the contradiction, and conflict, that's become so interesting as Vagabond continues. In that same piece, he verbalizes themes within the story, and for him personally, which are still being actively explored, more directly than ever, by Musashi, and perhaps by Inoue himself. He takes such responsibility for what he's depicted Musashi doing, Musashi's choices being his choices, that it's almost hard to separate the two at this point. I'm greatly compelled by this symbiotic relationship, and I think the LAST Manga Exhibition was the fulcrum of a series' evolution, not resolution.

I may end up being in the minority on this, but for me it's the opposite. I feel that Inoue just finished the series in a really beautiful way, and that's going to be a stumbling block for me in the future of the episodic releases. It's such a climactic and emotional ending, I imagine it will be hard for me to continue following the day-to-day life of Musashi with as much gusto since we just experienced the culmination of what Inoue has been working toward all these years.

The reports of Musashi's death have been greatly exaggerated. You're entitled to feel that way, particularly about episodic releases, just remember that it's no more indicative of the overall quality and health of the series than the frustrations and negative perception Berserk's episodic release schedule can similarly create for fans. Like following Berserk episodically, one has to give it the benefit of the doubt and jump in, reserving some judgment for the bigger picture.

As for that bigger picture, first, let me readily admit my bias the other way, I'd be following the latest Vagabond episodes if they were about Musashi learning tea etiquette. But, while you know Inoue and his overall work better than me, I can fairly say that it's not fair, and simply untrue, to say you've experienced the culmination of what Inoue has been working towards. I've tried to warn, and perhaps I've still done the material a disservice here, that we really haven't experienced the LAST Manga Exhibition. Let alone the fact that Vagabond continues, and continues to evolve around and expand on that material. Despite what we do know from the LAST Manga Exhibition, the parameters of the story still aren't so confined. It really doesn't give anything away about, or limit the possibilities of, future episodes, and is pretty self-contained. We don't even know what the final nature of the relationship between the LAST Manga material and the rest of the series is, as it's incomplete; conversely, so is the context and meaning of the exhibition itself in relation to the series. While I do think the exhibition is canon, it's not like it's truly the last volume of the series in an organic sense, as if Inoue actually drew the rest of the series, had it all done, and just spoiled the ending. They're not just two ends of the same piece, with a gap in the middle, that Inoue is dutifully filling in. From what we've seen, it's almost like they orbit one another, separate but directly linked, pushing and pulling on each other like gravity. That's what I find so fascinating and exciting about it other than the theme of the exhibition itself; the truly non-linear, interrelated nature of the storytelling it's created. Vagabond is still a living, breathing, evolving entity, and the LAST Manga Exhibition is just another part of that, albeit unorthodox. While it's technically the end of Musashi's life, it doesn't encompass the practical end of his spiritual journey from a storytelling standpoint. In a strange way, the continuation of Vagabond is also the continuation of the LAST Manga Exhibition, it's "spiritual successor" if you will. That's why I'm going to follow Musashi's continuing journey with a renewed interest, because it isn't finished by any means, not for Musashi, Inoue, or us.


Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #76 on: November 20, 2009, 01:16:03 AM »
Wow, that was a fantastic description of the LAST Manga Exhibition. Seriously, Inoue would be proud.

And that drawing is beautiful, he ended up looking a lot like the two he looked up to the most, especially Sekishusai. Very serene yet strong at the same time or something. Well, that scene where Fuki tries to cut him on his sleep says it all.

Oh, and look at the size of it! Man!



His expression looks kinda like Vol. 25's cover, but less aggressive and more peaceful.



Anyway, I'll also be posting some more photos now and then, just little things of interest, and probably the sequence with Inshun if people want to see that?
I'd love to see the sequence. But man, I think I might have an overdose if you keep this pace, give me some time to breath! Too much awesomeness in one week!  :troll:

Yeah, that could be an important distinction in this case, and I wondered about it as well when I read it. Earlier in the translation it does make that distinction with Otsu calling him Takezo, so I can only assume this was consistent, and accurate, with that, or that it could truly be taken either way.

I wonder who translated that? Are there any credits in the book? Either way, if Otsu calls him Takezo and Munisai calls him Musashi, I'd say it's accurate.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2009, 01:32:39 AM by Eluvei »

Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #77 on: November 20, 2009, 02:23:21 AM »
Wow, that was a fantastic description of the LAST Manga Exhibition. Seriously, Inoue would be proud.

Thanks, was still editing it into the wee hours of the night! I still need to do a more basic description or summary of the story itself, try to fill in the blanks between the transcription and the images available.

And that drawing is beautiful, he ended up looking a lot like the two he looked up to the most, especially Sekishusai. Very serene yet strong at the same time or something. Well, that scene where Fuki tries to cut him on his sleep says it all.

Oh, and look at the size of it! Man!

http://jcast.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/inoue9.jpg

His expression looks kinda like Vol. 25's cover, but less aggressive and more peaceful.

http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/7957/largeanimepaperscansvag.jpg

Good call, it is like his face on 25, but more open and passive. It's actually the first recognizable image of old Musashi's face, following another large paining of his silhouette at the top of the stairs, still looking sharp and imposing with that wild hair.

I'd love to see the sequence. But man, I think I might have an overdose if you keep this pace, give me some time to breath! Too much awesomeness in one week!

Heh, okay, I'll take it easy, we'll make Inshun the grand finale.

I wonder who translated that? Are there any credits in the book? Either way, if Otsu calls him Takezo and Munisai calls him Musashi, I'd say it's accurate.

Lots of credits actually, mostly for the event, then another dozen or so for the catalogue itself. No listings for "translators" or "translated by," but these were the most pertinent credits in that regard:

Funaki Nobuko, Content Design and Writing

Ono Keiko, Editing and Translation Coordination


Anyway, whoever did the translation did a great job in my opinion; seems perfect, straight forward and no awkwardness, even more impressive given the material.

Speaking of which, Go Rin No Sho anyone? First the leadup, the pages of which are beautiful, almost abstract, ink paintings themselves, but I photographed the scrolls to show they were included:

P.058

Musashi:
I have exhausted my words.
But I do not know what I will leave to the world.

P.059

Musashi:
Words are like the sea.
You must descend deep into the waters to see what lies in the bottom.
For those content to gaze, there is only beauty; and tedium.

P.060


Musashi: The truth lies here.
How it is accepted is only that, the truth for each man.

And later, Jotaro all the people that came to see Musashi other than his "friends"...


Jōnosuke: Yagyū Jōnosuke. My childhood name was Jōtarō. Master!!


P.129

Jōnosuke:
We are not the final ones to visit.
Many have heard about you, and want to catch a glance... learn from you
... they want to pay their respects.
There, outside the gate -- See, Master!






Jōnosuke: Master, you dispatched many... But for many more people...


P.135
Jōnosuke:
In the past... in the future... and for eternity...




Jōnosuke: You have shown the way.

Offline TheBranded1

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #78 on: November 20, 2009, 02:44:16 AM »


All of this is truly amazing. I"m planning to save money too, so I can get this in my hands as well. I feel if I don't I"ll miss on something so great.

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #79 on: November 21, 2009, 01:08:25 AM »
Thanks, was still editing it into the wee hours of the night! I still need to do a more basic description or summary of the story itself, try to fill in the blanks between the transcription and the images available.

Good to know you'll write more, I'm looking forward to it.

Anyway, whoever did the translation did a great job in my opinion; seems perfect, straight forward and no awkwardness, even more impressive given the material.

Yeah, from the full translation and that Inoue interview, it even looks like Viz translated it. I'm glad it's so professional, shows how they care for their overseas fans.


Thanks for the new sequence of images, it's one of the most beautiful so far, but I guess I already said that, and will probably just keep saying that while you post.
Every sequence has an "ending" feeling to them. I could totally see the last image you posted here as the last one of the exhibit, as well as that one with Kojiro at the beach, or the one with Musashi beside Otsu, or those after Munisai speaks to Musashi.

Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #80 on: November 21, 2009, 10:14:55 AM »
All of this is truly amazing. I"m planning to save money too, so I can get this in my hands as well. I feel if I don't I"ll miss on something so great.

Yeah, it really is a treasure, I was flipping through it for the umpteenth time the other night and just sort of marveling at it. Not only the artwork or what it represents, but even just the quality of book itself as a material object. It's just impressive, whether you know Vagabond or not, and if you are a Vagabond fan, it's like a holy book. I was literally thinking that while admiring it the other night, "This thing is like the Bible of Vagabond." The Vagabible. =)

Good to know you'll write more, I'm looking forward to it.

Yeah, I'm still re-reading and understanding it, both technically and thematically. Every time I look or read through it again, I see something I didn't notice before that sort of puts the whole thing in new perspective.

Yeah, from the full translation and that Inoue interview, it even looks like Viz translated it. I'm glad it's so professional, shows how they care for their overseas fans.

I can't speak for the relative degree of difficulty, but I'd actually put this ahead of Viz's own work. This again speaks to the quality of this publication.

Thanks for the new sequence of images, it's one of the most beautiful so far, but I guess I already said that, and will probably just keep saying that while you post.
Every sequence has an "ending" feeling to them. I could totally see the last image you posted here as the last one of the exhibit, as well as that one with Kojiro at the beach, or the one with Musashi beside Otsu, or those after Munisai speaks to Musashi.

Wait until you get a load of this. First, the plot device I wanted to write about is the ball of light, which is something you've all seen in the pictures I posted, but maybe took for granted (I know I did at first). It's the meaning of the white circle on the cover, a motif also on the spine and inside cover page, signified by just a white circle or dot. In the story, after a serious talk with Fuki that resonates deeply for both of them and their way of the sword, the ball of light comes out of Musashi's chest while he's in the dream-like state where receives his many visitors from the past. The significant thing about the ball of light is that it's full of thorns, and each of Musashi's special guests, presumably, removes one.

P.090

Otsū:
It's full of thorns.

P.091

Otsū:
They won't come out...










So that's the literal purpose and meaning behind the ball of light for the visitors, or vice versa. The figurative ones can be many, some obvious, some not. When we get to the end, and there appears to only be one thorn left, that's when Munisai asks...


Munisai: Musashi... Is there anything you still want?

After a lovely image of an earnest young Musashi, eyes open and decided, we're treated to this sequence:


Eight paintings, one unfortunately completely obscured by the page break in this photo. They depict various imagery of young mother and child, with an adolescent Musashi, carelessly holding a bokken to his side, looking on with innocent yearning. He drops the bokken, there's literally one suspended on the floor of the exhibit, and what looks like a thorn, then you see his mother embrace him from behind.


A final transition with the ball of light, then the beach, daylight:


Kojiro: Are you ready?




Kojiro: Let's go.



Offline Walter

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #81 on: November 21, 2009, 03:30:16 PM »
Slam Dunk also ends on the beach  :judo:
:femto: :slan: :ubik:

Offline slan69

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #82 on: November 21, 2009, 09:29:51 PM »
Could this possibly be the end for Vagabond? :sad:
Quote -

Love, hate, pain, pleasure, life, death. Everything is there… This is human... This is demonic!

~Slan~

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #83 on: November 21, 2009, 09:40:10 PM »
Wait until you get a load of this. First, the plot device I wanted to write about is the ball of light, which is something you've all seen in the pictures I posted, but maybe took for granted (I know I did at first). It's the meaning of the white circle on the cover, a motif also on the spine and inside cover page, signified by just a white circle or dot. In the story, after a serious talk with Fuki that resonates deeply for both of them and their way of the sword, the ball of light comes out of Musashi's chest while he's in the dream-like state where receives his many visitors from the past. The significant thing about the ball of light is that it's full of thorns, and each of Musashi's special guests, presumably, removes one.

I did take it for granted. That's the Jesus Heart you mentioned on that poster in Inoue's studio earlier, right? I didn't notice the ball of light was in so many pictures, it just seemed like a pretty effect Inoue decided to put in the paintings. That's very cool, I like how he manages to add weird stuff in the course of the series depending on what Musashi is going through (like Sloggo, the two old men, and Ueda, which are probably the "twists" he mentioned in the book) and not make the whole thing look ridiculous and... unbalanced. I think it makes it all rich and with more meaning than it normally would if he had decided to just end how he started it.

In fact, that's the main problem I have with Slam Dunk: it doesn't change at all. The problems the characters have to get over in the beginning of the series are exactly the same they have to face in the last part. Sure, it's fun to see how they manage to overcome their difficulties, but... they go through exactly the same like three times. It looked like Inoue was afraid to change dramatically (like he does on Vagabond) because of the enormous fanbase it attracted back then. It's understandable, and its quality is still very superior than other Shonen series, but that's still a big problem for me, and probably the reason I've never reread Slam Dunk. I mean, I felt like I reread it like 2 times when I was actually just reading the whole thing once.

Slam Dunk also ends on the beach  :judo:

Haha, yeah, although the meanings are quite the opposite. :troll:

Offline Walter

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #84 on: November 21, 2009, 09:50:43 PM »
In fact, that's the main problem I have with Slam Dunk: it doesn't change at all. The problems the characters have to get over in the beginning of the series are exactly the same they have to face in the last part.
I have many things to say about this, but they're better served in the Slam Dunk thread: http://www.skullknight.net/forum/index.php?topic=9151.25

Quote
Haha, yeah, although the meanings are quite the opposite. :troll:
That's because the pursuit of basketball normally doesn't involve killing dozens of people.
:femto: :slan: :ubik:

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #85 on: November 21, 2009, 10:24:51 PM »
That's because the pursuit of basketball normally doesn't involve killing dozens of people.

What I meant to say is that while the above scene shows the end of Musashi's journey, Sakuragi was at the beach to begin anew.

Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #86 on: November 23, 2009, 07:44:22 PM »
Slam Dunk also ends on the beach  :judo:
Could this possibly be the end for Vagabond? :sad:
Just a  reminder, new episode comes out on the 26th. :ganishka:

Also, I'm still reading the behind the scenes portion, which is important since it contains more clues as to Inoue's mindset going into this, and perhaps coming out. I can say though that Inoue officially started work on the exhibition on April 29th, 2008 and finished May 24th, 2008. Basically, between volume 28 and 29, he even had this to say at the time, taken straight from the Current Episodes Thread, which we obviously missed the significance of at the time:
Quote
It's been a while since I last started up again. After the manga exhibit in Ueno, the manuscript feels like a pretty small amount of work.
And my eyes and throat have been hit by an adenovirus infection...
   
INOUE TAKEHIKO
30 July 2008
Three volumes, going on four, have now been released since he completed work on the exhibition. I think we can lay the "end time" laments to a rest and focus on the fact Vagabond is still live and going in new and unexpected directions. So, let's not take it for granted over the misguided and erroneous notion the series actually ended a year and half, or almost four volumes, ago.

I did take it for granted. That's the Jesus Heart you mentioned on that poster in Inoue's studio earlier, right?

Presumably, that's the first shot of it, following Musashi's early thoughts on his words and what he's left behind, though it's only after his personal conversation with Fuki that the light comes out of him and, forgive the pun, the ball gets rolling.

I didn't notice the ball of light was in so many pictures, it just seemed like a pretty effect Inoue decided to put in the paintings.

Same here. BTW, in my last post, fixed a broken link to another previously released photo.

That's very cool, I like how he manages to add weird stuff in the course of the series depending on what Musashi is going through (like Sloggo, the two old men, and Ueda, which are probably the "twists" he mentioned in the book) and not make the whole thing look ridiculous and... unbalanced. I think it makes it all rich and with more meaning than it normally would if he had decided to just end how he started it.

Yeah, he certainly employs a lot of different storytelling techniques to great effect, even his between episode doodles in the volumes become important to how things are perceived. It's a testament to the medium as well, lots of stories have have important subtext, this is one of the only ones I can think of that seemingly has an actual subconscious.






It was good meeting you... Musashi.

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #87 on: November 24, 2009, 12:23:30 AM »
I think we can lay the "end time" laments to a rest and focus on the fact Vagabond is still live and going in new and unexpected directions. So, let's not take it for granted over the misguided and erroneous notion the series actually ended a year and half, or almost four volumes, ago.

Of course, I mean, do the exhibit's paintings give away something like Musashi fighting Ito Ittosai? I bet anyone that went to the exhibit had no idea that would happen and were surprised, just like we will be about the new things that will happen from now on, regardless of having seen these paintings and the translation.

Same here. BTW, in my last post, fixed a broken link to another previously released photo.

Oh, great. Now I actually notice the ball of light there.

Yeah, he certainly employs a lot of different storytelling techniques to great effect, even his between episode doodles in the volumes become important to how things are perceived. It's a testament to the medium as well, lots of stories have have important subtext, this is one of the only ones I can think of that seemingly has an actual subconscious.

Yeah. But, for example, when Ueda appeared as a ghost I have to admit I felt a little weird. And then, a few chapters in, it just felt natural and like something that truly belonged in the series. It's hard to explain.

Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2009, 10:18:20 AM »
Water: ive been meaning to ask you
how did you buy yours?
Griffith: ebay
Water: im interested in getting one too if its still possible
Griffith: I sent you the link.
Water: ah

Griffith: Refresh the thread for Yagyu goodness.
Water: he sort of reminds me of Kermit the frog there
Griffith: He looks very friendly.
The shape of the eyes.
Water: Yeah, no longer the hawk-eyed old man
Griffith: Almost like Kermie's.
What's funny is Musashi is obviously awestruck when they say that it was good knowing him, and he bows... while they insult each other off camera. =)

Of course, I mean, do the exhibit's paintings give away something like Musashi fighting Ito Ittosai? I bet anyone that went to the exhibit had no idea that would happen and were surprised, just like we will be about the new things that will happen from now on, regardless of having seen these paintings and the translation.

Yeah, as we've opined, whatever Inoue's intentions going into the exhibition, the series has certainly remained fluid afterward.

Yeah. But, for example, when Ueda appeared as a ghost I have to admit I felt a little weird. And then, a few chapters in, it just felt natural and like something that truly belonged in the series. It's hard to explain.

What's clever about those things is how they're integrated vaguely at first; Ueda's spirit for example, we see Ueda looking on behind Musashi when he hears he can't fight anymore, then when Musashi reacts, Ueda's not there, and we wonder if it was just in Musashi's head.

Speaking of which, in LAST Manga, one of the few characters that certainly isn't in Musashi's head or even a spirit, is Inshun. Alive and aging well, even the glimpses of him looking his years:


Fūki: As legend has it--
He first killed with a sword at thirteen.
Single-handedly dispatched seventy men.
Was never defeated.




Musashi: My time may be near... (huf... huf...)
Perhaps that is why I can see so many things... (Like Kitaro...)
Fūki: Hey!! I'm a living person!!
Musashi: Look... over there, too...


(Shoom...)
Inshun: You're still alive? Good. I've come to fulfill my promise.
Inshun: But this time, not to do battle




Musashi: ...You're not hiding a spear somewhere, are you?
Inshun: No way. (hmph)
Musashi: I never felt that frightened in my life, you bastard. (whew...)
Inshun: There is no need for more. We have already dueled two times.


Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #89 on: December 02, 2009, 12:21:48 PM »
I had no idea he showed up in flesh and bone. Thanks Griff, amazing post again... they all make me wanna cry!  :iva:

That sketch is beautiful, they kinda look like old Sekishusai and In'ei.

Speaking of our favorite elderly dudes, check out what the exhibit's staff wore at this year's exhibit:


Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #90 on: December 03, 2009, 08:58:22 AM »
That sketch is beautiful, they kinda look like old Sekishusai and In'ei.

Nice observation, it didn't occur to me though the parallel is perfect.

Speaking of our favorite elderly dudes, check out what the exhibit's staff wore at this year's exhibit:



Haha stylish, I wouldn't mind having one of those. Any idea what the old geezers are saying?

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #91 on: December 04, 2009, 03:25:19 PM »
Haha stylish, I wouldn't mind having one of those. Any idea what the old geezers are saying?

Unfortunately the little I knew of Japanese is now long forgotten. We're in need of someone of Puella's level for the Inn! :judo:

Oh well, we can't complain that much, Viz does an amazing job, and even the catalogues and Inoue News have good translations. :judo:

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #92 on: December 16, 2009, 06:31:10 PM »
Unfortunately the little I knew of Japanese is now long forgotten. We're in need of someone of Puella's level for the Inn! :judo:

Yeah, and we're lucky to have someone of Puella's level contributing consistently to SK.net at all. As for the Inn's unofficial translator, it looks like Uriel's already gone again. =)

Speaking of translations... I still need to email Inoue's website about their archives. If they haven't been saving all those personal Inoue entries, I'm going to eat volume 30 of both Vagabond and Berserk.

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #93 on: December 17, 2009, 02:05:40 PM »
Speaking of translations... I still need to email Inoue's website about their archives. If they haven't been saving all those personal Inoue entries, I'm going to eat volume 30 of both Vagabond and Berserk.
It'll be good when you contact them. Imagine if they do still have these archives and send them exclusively to the Inn as gratitude for caring so much about Inoue!  :guts:
get ready to eat some tasty paper

Anyway, we can expect lots of news on Osaka's exhibit from now on, Inoue's finally working hard on it, at least that's the impression we get from his latest news. I'm excited, I hope that blog shows us pics of the making ofs, some paintings and Inoue working on lightning and stuff.

Update: new blog post contained this:

« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 10:19:19 PM by Eluvei »

Offline Griffith

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #94 on: December 19, 2009, 08:52:53 AM »
It'll be good when you contact them. Imagine if they do still have these archives and send them exclusively to the Inn as gratitude for caring so much about Inoue!  :guts:
get ready to eat some tasty paper
If only, I'd settle for them just having retained it. :ganishka:

It would be rather foolish, or at least galling to fans, to have not archived what amounts to a diary of the last several years of Inoue's creative life. He could have compiled and edited it into a book if nothing else. I can see him not caring though.

Anyway, we can expect lots of news on Osaka's exhibit from now on, Inoue's finally working hard on it, at least that's the impression we get from his latest news. I'm excited, I hope that blog shows us pics of the making ofs, some paintings and Inoue working on lightning and stuff.

That'd be very cool, the behind the scenes stuff is always interesting. I'd like to see even more of him setting up or overseeing the specific exibhits such as the sand or the suspended bokken.

Update: new blog post contained this:

Nice, looks like Musashi's let his hair down for this one. :guts:

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #95 on: December 28, 2009, 09:08:50 PM »
That'd be very cool, the behind the scenes stuff is always interesting. I'd like to see even more of him setting up or overseeing the specific exibhits such as the sand or the suspended bokken.

Sweet! We better start checking the blog on a daily basis:

http://www.flow-er.co.jp/osaka/ishibashi/


A lot of updates! Lots of behind the scenes, and The Vagabond Inn Official Translator is doing its best for us, as usual.   :badbone:


Quote
This new product? But not listening.

No, this really this blog because it is totally unconfirmed information please do not blind faith.

Big image: http://www.flow-er.co.jp/osaka/ishibashi/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/IMG_2802-1024x682.jpg

I wonder what he meant. Maybe a new (unconfirmed) catalogue, or maybe the blogger (Inoue? Probably not) is just using the pics as reference to how things are supposed to look on Osaka while talking about something completely different. Time will tell, I suppose.





Wow.



Apparently, it's true. More pictures of a (new?) catalogue, looks exactly like 2008's. There's also a picture of the "making of" catalogue opened, scroll way down to see it all:

http://www.suntory.co.jp/culture/smt/gallery/index.html

Also, some pretty nice stuff to buy on the exhibit:



The Osaka Tourist Guide has also been updated with a cool pic and some info in English:

http://www.osaka-info.jp/en/search/detail/event_8748.html

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #96 on: December 28, 2009, 09:19:37 PM »
I wonder if they've updated the Catalogues with new behind the scenes info, and perhaps rephotographed the exhibit at this specific location? The one visible picture in the white exhibit visitor's guide there looks identical to the old one.

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #97 on: December 29, 2009, 01:22:49 AM »
It's all pretty strange, they seem to have just finished setting up the exhibit... and they already have pictures of all the paintings and have completely remade the Catalogues? It seems more like a new release of the first Catalogue if you ask me.

Also, from what the other blog post said (a quote I posted above), they weren't sure if it was going to be released, and they wouldn't risk make a top quality remake of the book to be unsure of its release.

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Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #98 on: January 05, 2010, 08:59:24 AM »
Yeah, for the reasons you mention, and the appearance of catalogues, I think it's most likely a reprinting as well. I wonder if they'll do other supplemental behind the scenes material for the specific exhibition sites. Otherwise, there's not much reason against using the original as the official catalogue of the overall exhibit experience.

That is, unless Inoue makes a drastic change.

Offline Eluvei

Re: Inoue Takehiko: The LAST Manga Exhibition
« Reply #99 on: January 11, 2010, 01:36:59 AM »
This time, instead of writing on the wall, people wrote messages on their cell phones and they were projected on the wall.