Author Topic: What factors define an Apostle design?  (Read 1118 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pedro-kun

  • Of the World
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Karma: 2
  • Gender: Male
  • I sacrifice my ''Personal Text'' for eternal life.
What factors define an Apostle design?
« on: September 08, 2015, 02:43:28 PM »
I always wondered this, but never got to any conclusion (maybe there isn't (?) or maybe I'm just distracted and not paying enough attention to the mangá).

So, why Zodd's Apostle design resembles a minotaur with a lion's face while the Count's resembles some kind of sluggish appearance?

Are the motives of the sacrifice and/or the subject's personality a factor to their designs, or are they really just completely random? 

Thank you.  :zodd:

ps- Sorry for bad English, not my native language. (hope it was at least ''readable'').

Offline Aazealh

  • 髑髏の騎士
  • Administrator
  • Of Terror
  • *****
  • Posts: 18399
  • Karma: 624
  • Gender: Male
  • そうはいかぬ
Re: What factors define an Apostle design?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2015, 02:59:26 PM »
Frankly I think it's at its heart a matter of having a cool design. That's really the most important part. It's only a guess, but I'm sure Miura conceives these characters as a whole, creating their human and apostle forms together as well as their personality and backstory.

Now if you mean what defines them within the world of Berserk, then yeah I think it's safe to assume their personalities plays a role, but also more importantly what their wish to the God Hand is. The count wanted an end to pain, and in a way, he got one: his body could regenerate to an incredible extent. If you pay attention, you'll find that the same applies to all apostles.

On a side note, regarding Zodd, he's actually more of a hybrid that you make him out to be: an ungulate's legs and horns, a big cat's head and paws, a human torso, bat wings, and a reptile's tail. The ultimate predator! :zodd:

Offline jackson_hurley

  • Of the Vortex
  • ****
  • Posts: 1155
  • Karma: 59
  • even the horses are cut in half!
Re: What factors define an Apostle design?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2015, 12:39:10 AM »
The ultimate predator! :zodd:

I'd rather say ultimate warrior.   :ganishka:

Offline Sancho

Re: What factors define an Apostle design?
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2015, 11:45:46 AM »
It's probably a question of cool design, but not always. Rosine wanted to be an elf, and she became a sort of monstrous imitation of an elf, but actually she was an insect. I think it depends of what the human in question desire the most. Offering your most precious thing to the God Hand, you realize your wish, but it's the same thing of using evil to oppose your destiny. So it's true that the apostles have obtained what they wanted, but they had to became monsters in return, since in the act of sacrifice they separeted themselves from their humanity.
So i think that in some way their design have some connection to the desire they asked, but it's inevitable that their look is that of a monster, regardless of their desire, since this is what they are now.

Offline Aazealh

  • 髑髏の騎士
  • Administrator
  • Of Terror
  • *****
  • Posts: 18399
  • Karma: 624
  • Gender: Male
  • そうはいかぬ
Re: What factors define an Apostle design?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2015, 08:43:27 AM »
It's probably a question of cool design, but not always. Rosine wanted to be an elf, and she became a sort of monstrous imitation of an elf, but actually she was an insect. I think it depends of what the human in question desire the most.

I think you're conflating two different (and incompatible) approaches here. It's obviously always a question of cool design because the author's goal is too create cool and interesting characters. But it's also always tied to what the character desired in the story because, well, that's how the story is written.

Basically, like I said in my post, the question can be taken in two ways: from within Berserk's world or from an outside perspective. Both are correct because Miura always creates a character as a whole, in a way that is consistent within the story.