Griffith's Title?

Has Griffith always been refered to as Falcon?  I thought it was Hawk.  And when did Band of the Hawk become Band of the Falcon?  Is just a translation thing or did Miura change it at some point?

I know this Falcon thing has been goin on for a bit now but it just dawned on me to ask when this started.
 

Walter

Administrator
Staff member
dwarfkicker said:
Has Griffith always been refered to as Falcon? I thought it was Hawk. And when did Band of the Hawk become Band of the Falcon? Is just a translation thing or did Miura change it at some point?
After discussing it a bit and Googling and AskJeeving like any GOOD internet citizen would do, I discovered a number of enlightening things.

What's the difference between a Hawk and Falcon ?
This website answers this question. The differences are subtle, but physiologically substantial. In my own words, a Falcon is more aesthetically beautiful than a Hawk. Each are Birds of Prey, however the Falcon is more curvacious.

The change in terminology (as evidenced by the kanji TAKA, previously translated as Hawk, but with the added furigana, now translates to Falcon) could represent the metamorphosis of Griffith from human to "god". His appearance, like his bird associate, recieved an aesthetic makeover.

But really... I think we need someone who has both translation skills and knowledge of Birds to give us a definative answer.
 

Aazealh

そうはいかぬ
Staff member
*Gyom* said:
You may notice he was referred to a Phoenix between his Hawk and Falcon "ranks". That's rather significative imo.
The honorific title the king gave him ? I don't see how it's significant at all, especially considering nobody ever called him that way, and that he was demoted after the Charlotte incident.
 

Lliugusamui

around the corner
Imho, it means as a phoenix, Griffith was bound to be reborn from his own ashes (here you may link it with the demon baby). I don't think the King put a meaning in this honorific title, but Miura could have done so.

Guil
 

Aazealh

そうはいかぬ
Staff member
*Gyom* said:
Imho, it means as a phoenix, Griffith was bound to be reborn from his own ashes (here you may link it with the demon baby). I don't think the King put a meaning in this honorific title, but Miura could have done so.
Well, I just see it as a fancy title honestly, I don't see why Miura would have put some foretelling at that point and in such a way.

To get back to the original topic, I'd like to precise from what Walter said that the word TAKA only features the "Falcon" furigana in the arc title (the current chapter is called "Falconia" though) as far as I can remember, when said by a character, it's just TAKA.
 

roberto999

The Black Chick of Darkness
The difference between the Hawks and the falcons is that the Hawks are part of the family of the Accipitridae with among others kites, vultures and eagles.

The Falcons are part of the family of the Falconidae, a family all for themselves.

So while both are raptors and they appears to be alike, they are really different animals like, let us say, pumas and tigers.
By the way did you see the pics of the white hawk and the black hawk ?
 
Aazealh said:
To get back to the original topic, I'd like to precise from what Walter said that the word TAKA only features the "Falcon" furigana in the arc title
Which is also an obvious "Star Wars" pun.
(the current chapter is called "Falconia" though)
Yup. So calling Griffith "the Falcon" seems more appropriate (right now, anyway).
as far as I can remember, when said by a character, it's just TAKA.
Then again, the official English term for the "Taka no Dan" is "Hawk Soldiers"... ^^;

This is one of the few instances when I think that a French translation would be easier to write than an English one. In French, "taka" = "falcon" = "hawk" = "faucon". Just "faucon".
 

Aazealh

そうはいかぬ
Staff member
Olivier Hague said:
Yup. So calling Griffith "the Falcon" seems more appropriate (right now, anyway).
Yeah, obviously (didn't mean otherwise).

Olivier Hague said:
Then again, the official English term for the "Taka no Dan" is "Hawk Soldiers"... ^^;
The Band of the Hawk led by the White Falcon... Well, at least it's not that redundant ;D.

Olivier Hague said:
This is one of the few instances when I think that a French translation would be easier to write than an English one. In French, "taka" = "falcon" = "hawk" = "faucon". Just "faucon".
Yeah, most definitely ^^;

PS: "Morte-couille! Tu es fait, mon mignon!"... I just love it ::).
 
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