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I recently rewatched Kill Bill, The Good The Bad And The Ugly, along with Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino is FAR from my favorite director, but I can appreciate the bit of western spice he adds into his films, especially when it comes to the spicy dialogue. It’s so entertaining and jaw dropping when he just catches your attention in the middle of nothing.
Agreed!

I myself just finished re-watching all of Tarantino’s movies (except for Death Proof, which I just watched for the first time). Really nice ride!

At the moment, this is my ranking of his movies:

- Pulp Fiction. It doesn't matter how many times I watch this movie, I can't get enough. Simply the best in my book.
- Inglorious Basterds. A fantastic movie, and what an opening scene!
- The Hateful Eight. A movie that is almost three hours long, that takes place mostly in a single room and that still manages to keep me as invested a this one deserves no less.
- Kill Bill: Volume 1. A very fun revenge movie.
- Jackie Brown. This is a really good movie, but I simply enjoyed the ones above more.
- Kill Bill: Volume 2. To me, not as strong as the first one.
- Reservoir Dogs. I'm not sure this movie has aged all that well, to be honest.
- Django Unchained. I don't know why, but this movie just doesn't click with me. There are parts that, by comparison to other movies in this list, are flat out boring. Also, this is the movie that feels the longest in this list.
- Death Proof. A great final chase scene that takes too long to get there.
 

Griffith

My posts are better.
This is a good listing but you're still missing arguably two of his best:

Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood

&

True Romance (written by)

I think Romance might have aged a bit like Dogs, and I don't know if it's his best film but Hollywood is still my current favorite of his. For completionists there's also his work on more infamous projects like From Dusk Till Dawn, Natural Born Killers, Four Rooms, My Best Friend's Birthday, various television one-offs like ER, and he punched up some scenes in Crimson Tide for Tony Scott (I'd imagine the references to Silver Surfer have to be him =).
 
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This is a good listing but you're still missing arguably two of his best:

Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood

&

True Romance (written by)

I think Romance might have aged a bit like Dogs, and I don't know if it's his best film but Hollywood is still my current favorite of his. For completionists there's also his work on more infamous projects like From Dusk Till Dawn, Natural Born Killers, Four Rooms, My Best Friend's Birthday, various television one-offs like ER, and he punched up some scenes in Crimson Tide for Tony Scott (I'd imagine the references to Silver Surfer have to be him =).
How could I miss Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood! I just watched it last Saturday. :farnese: Thanks for pointing it out!

This one in particular is a tricky one for me because there are parts that I really liked and parts that I didn’t like as much. For example, whereas the revisionist history worked perfectly for me in Inglorious Basterds, it didn’t work at all in One Upon a Time. All things considered, I think I’d put it either right before or right after Kill Bill: Volume 2.

This time I focused only on the movies in the nine “canonical” films, but your comment made me want to get closer to the completionist path. I’ve always been a fan of Natural Born Killers, so it might be time to watch it again. Also, it’s been ages since I watched True Romance (I watched on VHS before I even knew who Tarantino was), so that one’s due for a re-watch as well.
 

Oburi

All praise Grail
This is a good listing but you're still missing arguably two of his best:

Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood

&

True Romance (written by)

I think Romance might have aged a bit like Dogs, and I don't know if it's his best film but Hollywood is still my current favorite of his. For completionists there's also his work on more infamous projects like From Dusk Till Dawn, Natural Born Killers, Four Rooms, My Best Friend's Birthday, various television one-offs like ER, and he punched up some scenes in Crimson Tide for Tony Scott (I'd imagine the references to Silver Surfer have to be him =).
There’s a great fan edit of True Romance that rearranges the scenes in non chronological order and adds title cards for the “chapters”, as it was in the original script, much like Pulp Fiction. It also includes Tarantinos original ending, which was shot but ultimately swapped for something less depressing. It’s also got deleted scenes that were cut for time ( including more of Walken and Oldman and a brief cameo from a young Jack Black). It’s called the Tarantino Cut and I highly recommend it. My preferred version of the movie.
 
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Griffith

My posts are better.
How could I miss Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood! I just watched it last Saturday. :farnese: Thanks for pointing it out!

This one in particular is a tricky one for me because there are parts that I really liked and parts that I didn’t like as much. For example, whereas the revisionist history worked perfectly for me in Inglorious Basterds, it didn’t work at all in One Upon a Time.

Well, depending which revisions you mean, I actually think the implications of Hollywood's are more consequential and meaningful to the film's themes and message, which is actually pretty solemn in the end when you think of the totality of what it depicts versus what actually happened. Whereas in Basterds it was more whimsically unexpected movie magic that was a great moment but didn't change the overall outcome of that history as much (even though any changes to WWII, even the timing, is technically far more consequential from a life and death standpoint). What I mean is, the contrast of the difference is far more significant and haunting.

All things considered, I think I’d put it either right before or right after Kill Bill: Volume 2.

That's fair considering what you have around there. I'd have trouble really ordering them, especially my favorites versus which I think are best. For instance, I agree Pulp Fiction still has to be considered one of, if not the most, significant, but I know it so well it wouldn't be near the top of my watch list these days, and most are pretty entertaining in their own right. Overall, I think Basterds might be the crown jewel because it was like lightning striking again, proving the second half of his career was going to be just as relevant as the first, and simultaneously allowed people to appreciate the Kill Bills in a different light as compared to the more "traditional" crime films of his early career and the ahistorical exploitation flicks of the second half. To put it another way, fun as the Bills were, he could have been on a downward trajectory after them and Death Proof. Basterds changed all that and I think gave him a new voice and a lane to successfully continue in that vein ever since.

This time I focused only on the movies in the nine “canonical” films, but your comment made me want to get closer to the completionist path. I’ve always been a fan of Natural Born Killers, so it might be time to watch it again.

Well, for the record I think he washes his hands of that version because of Stone's significant changes, but I think the original script is published as well.

Also, it’s been ages since I watched True Romance (I watched on VHS before I even knew who Tarantino was), so that one’s due for a re-watch as well.
There’s a great fan edit of True Romance that rearranges the scenes in non chronological and adds title cards for the “chapters”, as it was in the original script, much like Pulp Fiction. It also includes Tarantinos original ending, which was shot but ultimately swapped for something less depressing. It’s also got deleted scenes that were cut for time ( including more of Walken and Oldman and a brief cameo from a young Jack Black). It’s called the Tarantino Cut and I highly recommend it. My preferred version of the movie.

Ooh, that indeed sounds tantalizing! I'll have to look into that when I get a chance. Though it should be said the original still had Tarantino's blessing despite the changes, and he and Tony Scott obviously remained friendly after the fact. Listen to The Rewatchbles podcast where Tarantino guests to cover Scott's Unstoppable. It's basically a love letter from one filmmaker to another.
 
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Oburi

All praise Grail
Yup I did listen to that podcast. It’s great! Also Tarantino hardly ever does commentaries (not even for his own films) but he did one for the True Romance dvd which is great. He truly appreciated Scotts version and even endorsed his ending. He also did a commentary for FromDusk Till Dawn with Rodriguez and for Hot Fuzz with Edgar Wright. I love Tarantino and could listen to him geek out about film all day.
 
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Well, depending which revisions you mean, I actually think the implications of Hollywood's are more consequential and meaningful to the film's themes and message, which is actually pretty solemn in the end when you think of the totality of what it depicts versus what actually happened. Whereas in Basterds it was more whimsically unexpected movie magic that was a great moment but didn't change the overall outcome of that history as much (even though any changes to WWII, even the timing, is technically far more consequential from a life and death standpoint). What I mean is, the contrast of the difference is far more significant and haunting.
I think you're exactly right. Thinking about it, my problem with the change to history in Once Upon a Time is probably related to the fact that it is more haunting. I just found the whole thing really heartbreaking. I guess so far I've only been able to process that aspect of the movie viscerally and it hit me as hard both times.

That's fair considering what you have around there. I'd have trouble really ordering them, especially my favorites versus which I think are best.

Perhaps you could have two lists, one according to your favorites and one according to which ones you think are best? I'd be very interested in looking at those lists or any list you may produce. :guts:

For instance, I agree Pulp Fiction still has to be considered one of, if not the most, significant, but I know it so well it wouldn't be near the top of my watch list these days, and most are pretty entertaining in their own right. Overall, I think Basterds might be the crown jewel because it was like lightning striking again, proving the second half of his career was going to be just as relevant as the first, and simultaneously allowed people to appreciate the Kill Bills in a different light as compared to the more "traditional" crime films of his early career and the ahistorical exploitation flicks of the second half. To put it another way, fun as the Bills were, he could have been on a downward trajectory after them and Death Proof. Basterds changed all that and I think gave him a new voice and a lane to successfully continue in that vein ever since.

To be honest, I hadn't thought about Basterds that way, but I think you're spot on.

Well, for the record I think he washes his hands of that version because of Stone's significant changes, but I think the original script is published as well.
Yeah, I knew that Tarantino wasn't a fan of Stone's version, but I've always been. It may be one of those things that arrived at the right time for me and it has stayed with me since. Actually, the soundtrack for this movie is one of the very few movie soundtracks to which I listen every now and then, which I guess says something.

Listen to The Rewatchbles podcast where Tarantino guests to cover Scott's Unstoppable. It's basically a love letter from one filmmaker to another.

I'll check it out!

There’s a great fan edit of True Romance that rearranges the scenes in non chronological order and adds title cards for the “chapters”, as it was in the original script, much like Pulp Fiction. It also includes Tarantinos original ending, which was shot but ultimately swapped for something less depressing. It’s also got deleted scenes that were cut for time ( including more of Walken and Oldman and a brief cameo from a young Jack Black). It’s called the Tarantino Cut and I highly recommend it. My preferred version of the movie.
Very interesting! I think I'll watch both versions, though I'll start with Scott's. Thank you for the recommendation! :serpico:
 

Griffith

My posts are better.
I Care A Lot (Netflix) - An interesting deep dive turned thriller set around the world of adult care and guardianship, particularly the seedy, scammy side! This is a good movie, but after the first act gets a little comic book-y and in over its head with exciting plot twists when the premise was enough for a whole movie! This should have been Nightcrawler for adult care scams, but instead more makes it less as it goes for some pretty unconvincing crime thriller stuff that overstays its welcome and challenges your suspension of disbelief. Still, some fine actors and performances and a tantalizing idea, even if the plot stretches it thin instead of exploring its richness.

Godzilla vs. Kong (the toilet) - I guess I'm still naive to think it should be pretty straightforward to have Godzilla and King Kong meet up and fight once you've already established they exist, but this was, guess what... unfathomably bad! I had no expectations except for some notable monster action, but this was another 15 minutes of underwhelming CGI monster rolling (half the time Godzilla looks like he's an asset out of a video game) and 100 minutes of the most irritatingly stupid characters and galaxy-brained plot you've ever seen... and for no reason (you didn't need any of it)!

It's like they were trying to present this in the most unnatural, worst way possible. Most of this movie has nothing to do with Godzilla and King Kong fighting. It's like if 90% of Jurassic Park was about the trip there. The story is akin to the moon being made out of cheese and we need to get Kong to eat for plot reasons. The monsters might as well be action figures or big as planets because the movie has no sense of scope or scale to give a sense of size or grandeur, and just looks like shit. There's also no weight, logistics or stakes in this movie, like they destroy Hong Kong and must kill millions of people, but you literally see no human beings present in the streets or any mention of it (it'd be the biggest tragic disaster in our lifetimes and everyone just smiles and nods after like it was an exhibition wrestling match =). They don't even establish why it'd be good or bad for any particular monster to win or lose, but they make sure to notify the audience which monster appeared to win each round (because if we're watching this, it's assumed we're fucking morons eating popcorn covered in our own rancid drool). The only drama or emotion is how bad I felt for Alexander Skarsgard for having to make the stupid faces of his non-charachter in this gadawful movie.

This makes the Snyder Cut look like Citizen Kane and WW84 like Casablanca. The director of this cheap looking VOD movie should be put in prison and the writer(s) should be stranded at sea without water. Like the rest of this "monsterverse" crap, watch the medicore fights on youtube and think, "this somehow looks worse than I thought" and save yourself a couple precious hours of life. Watching this I felt like Tim Heidecker during the Batman dream sequence in Snyder Cut, like the plot simulated a psychological break from reality; what is going on, what's happening? I can't believe this was made and put out into the world AS IS!

Perhaps you could have two lists, one according to your favorites and one according to which ones you think are best? I'd be very interested in looking at those lists or any list you may produce. :guts:

Well, I could definitely use a palette cleanser. So here goes...

Best/Most Significant:
Pulp Fiction
Inglorious Basterds
Jackie Brown
Reservoir Dogs
Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood
Kill Bill Vol. 1
Django Unchained
(will probably age poorly)
The Hateful Eight
Kill Bill Vol. 2
Death Proof


Favorites/Watching Tonight:
Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood
Jackie Brown
Inglorious Basterds
Kill Bill Vol. 1
The Hateful Eight
Kill Bill Vol. 2
Pulp Fiction
Reservoir Dogs
Django Unchained
Death Proof


This is so close and/or fluid I'm not even sure I agree with my own favorite picks. For example, the only reason Pulp Fiction and Dogs is so low on my current favorites list is because I've owned those DVDs since DVDs existed and have played them to death; they were such unquestionable favorites at one point I can't even stand to look at them anymore. :ganishka:

Also, given my top two I guess I enjoy Tarantino's "hangout" movies most of all.

As for the "significant" picks, I think that top 3 will endure and the rest can be argued over forever.
 
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Oburi

All praise Grail
I agree that the hangout movies are my personal favorites as well. But what’s up with Django Unchained being so low? Id put it after Inglorious Basterds. I fucking love that movie. The descent into hell as they travel into the Deep South covertly and the bloodbath revenge ending is just so satisfying . I saw it and in theaters with my old man and we ate it up. It also flew by, despite being quite a long movie, which is always a good sign. Very rewatchable too.
 

Griffith

My posts are better.
I agree that the hangout movies are my personal favorites as well. But what’s up with Django Unchained being so low?

Well, I've only seen it, and Death Proof, once, which might account for their relatively low rankings on my lists. Also, despite all the cool scenes, I do remember feeling the length, and the repetiviness of another faux-exploitation revisionist history revenge fantasy coming off Basterds. Plus, its the pinnacle of QT's controversial, uh, exploration of race and black culture as an enthusiastic white guy, which I already don't think has aged well and likely further won't. More simply, I'm just not as big on the dialogue and performances, including Foxx and Waltz (pretty important), as some of his other films. So, it's not any one thing, but those are some reasons I don't have it higher. It's not like I didn't like it either, I just don't love it, but maybe I'd feel differently upon review.
 

Oburi

All praise Grail
Interesting. For me, it just worked. And it actually wasn’t until Once Upon a Time... (which I regard highly as well) that the history revisionist stuff started to put me off a bit. My fear is that its uniqueness in Basterds, where it was used brilliantly, will be lessened by its use in subsequent films. The last thing I would want as a fan is for that to become a “thing”. Like how M. Night Shyamolan has his TWISTS. I’m afraid Quentin will have to figure out a new way to interestingly end a period piece, if that’s the direction a future film goes. Speaking of which, I think he’s down to the last one right? Unless he allows himself some wiggle room.
 

Aazealh

Administrator
Staff member
Interesting. For me, it just worked. And it actually wasn’t until Once Upon a Time... (which I regard highly as well) that the history revisionist stuff started to put me off a bit. My fear is that its uniqueness in Basterds, where it was used brilliantly, will be lessened by its use in subsequent films. The last thing I would want as a fan is for that to become a “thing”. Like how M. Night Shyamolan has his TWISTS. I’m afraid Quentin will have to figure out a new way to interestingly end a period piece, if that’s the direction a future film goes. Speaking of which, I think he’s down to the last one right? Unless he allows himself some wiggle room.

You know what? I personally was put off by that right from the beginning, in Inglorious Basterds, which I would say I enjoyed less than Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight. I haven't given it much thought, but for what it's worth this last one is probably my favorite recent Tarantino film. Oh and as for changing history in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, I was actually fine with it. I was familiar the killings long before the movie and really didn't relish the thought of putting that on film, so this little alternate reality deal (almost cartoonish really) was enjoyable in an almost cathartic way. Whereas for the nazi stuff, I don't know it just felt too cartoonish maybe?
 

Walter

Administrator
Staff member
I only watched Django fairly recently (3 months ago?). I really enjoyed it! I thought the slow build up to the actual action delivered a powerful payoff, and I also thought the Django montage sequence and overall building him up to be a kind of bounty hunter superhero felt like it was straight out of an anime — in a good way.

It had absolutely no staying power in my brain though. I think that's because pretty much every character is cut from a very familiar cloth, so that aside from the overall verve of the production, nothing really stuck out.

I couldn't even finish Hollywood, though I've tried three separate times. Nothing against it, it just doesn't feel like it's for me. So many disparate scenes, it feels more like a pastiche.
 

Vampire_Hunter_Bob

Cats are great
Oh and as for changing history in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, I was actually fine with it. I was familiar the killings long before the movie and really didn't relish the thought of putting that on film, so this little alternate reality deal (almost cartoonish really) was enjoyable in an almost cathartic way.
I was fine with it too for the same reasons. It could have been improved on if Manson had got it at the end too, but that most likely would have been a step too far.
 
Best/Most Significant:
Pulp Fiction
Inglorious Basterds
Jackie Brown
Reservoir Dogs
Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood
Kill Bill Vol. 1
Django Unchained
(will probably age poorly)
The Hateful Eight
Kill Bill Vol. 2
Death Proof


Favorites/Watching Tonight:
Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood
Jackie Brown
Inglorious Basterds
Kill Bill Vol. 1
The Hateful Eight
Kill Bill Vol. 2
Pulp Fiction
Reservoir Dogs
Django Unchained
Death Proof


This is so close and/or fluid I'm not even sure I agree with my own favorite picks. For example, the only reason Pulp Fiction and Dogs is so low on my current favorites list is because I've owned those DVDs since DVDs existed and have played them to death; they were such unquestionable favorites at one point I can't even stand to look at them anymore. :ganishka:

Also, given my top two I guess I enjoy Tarantino's "hangout" movies most of all.

As for the "significant" picks, I think that top 3 will endure and the rest can be argued over forever.
Thanks for sharing the lists! I thought it was interesting how different they are (but it makes sense). I guess the one certain takeaway is that Death Proof is the worst of them all, period. :ganishka:

In any case, I just watched True Romance, Scott's version. Unfortunately, I only thought it was ok. As Griffith already suggested in a previous post, I don't think the movie has aged well, not only did it feel dated to me (and not in a good way), there's some stuff that wouldn't fly in today's world, at least not to the same extent. For example, the scene with Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken. On the bright side, what an amazing cast! And they all did a fantastic job, except maybe Michael Rapaport (I really like the guy, but his was the weakest performance, in my opinion).

I tried searching for the Tarantino Cut, but I failed. I'll try again some other time...
 

Griffith

My posts are better.
Thanks for sharing the lists! I thought it was interesting how different they are (but it makes sense). I guess the one certain takeaway is that Death Proof is the worst of them all, period. :ganishka:

Yeah, you probably won't find too many Death Proof truthers out there singing its praises as the best of Tarantino. Though, I haven't seen the extended cut of it that's supposed to be more of a real movie as opposed to the intentionally chopped for time, to the point of incoherency, grindhouse concept.

I remember a review of Grindhouse warning that Tarantino and Rodriguez should be kept away from one another because they just bring out the worst in each other. =)

In any case, I just watched True Romance, Scott's version. Unfortunately, I only thought it was ok. As Griffith already suggested in a previous post, I don't think the movie has aged well, not only did it feel dated to me (and not in a good way), there's some stuff that wouldn't fly in today's world, at least not to the same extent. For example, the scene with Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken.

Great scene, probably wouldn't be written today though. Coming from the regressive, racially ignorant, and extremely homophobic 90s, I'm not a fan of today's "morally guided storytelling" trends because it can be so narrow and limiting (though such limitations can spur thoughtful creativity). Storytelling is exploring the human condition, including dark, evil shit or just plain bad people, and not necessarily in some puerile or moralizing way (rather, it just is what it is), but you wouldn't necessarily know that from most of today's movies. On the other hand, that stuff could also be gimmicky, hackneyed and exploitative as fuck back in my day. Just look at all the shitty wannabe Tarantino knock-offs that came out that decade and beyond. Still, I prefer that to the Transformers, Monsterverse or Fast franchises, which are basically about nothing for nobody in particular. Even the shitty tentpole movies back then still had some rough edges because they simply didn't know any better.

On the bright side, what an amazing cast! And they all did a fantastic job, except maybe Michael Rapaport (I really like the guy, but his was the weakest performance, in my opinion).

Yeah, he wasn't great, and it not being directed by Tarantino probably hurt the tone and performances overall because he just has such a unique voice that people didn't fully know then. Scott probably did as well as possible though, as evidenced by the infamous aforementioned scene above.
 
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Yeah, you probably won't find too many Death Proof truthers out there singing its praises as the best of Tarantino. Though, I haven't seen the extended cut of it that's supposed to be more of a real movie as opposed to the intentionally chopped for time, to the point of incoherency, grindhouse concept.
Before watching the movie, I had no idea what a grindhouse movie was but, if this one is representative of the genre, then the genre is not for me. :shrug:

I remember a review of Grindhouse warning that Tarantino and Rodriguez should be kept away from one another because they just bring out the worst in each other. =)
:ganishka:

Great scene, probably wouldn't be written today though. Coming from the regressive, racially ignorant, and extremely homophobic 90s, I'm not a fan of today's "morally guided storytelling" trends because it can be so narrow and limiting (though such limitations can spur thoughtful creativity). Storytelling is exploring the human condition, including dark, evil shit or just plain bad people, and not necessarily in some puerile or moralizing way (rather, it just is what it is), but you wouldn't necessarily know that from most of today's movies. On the other hand, that stuff could also be gimmicky, hackneyed and exploitative as fuck back in my day. Just look at all the shitty wannabe Tarantino knock-offs that came out that decade and beyond. Still, I prefer that to the Transformers, Monsterverse or Fast franchises, which are basically about nothing for nobody in particular. Even the shitty tentpole movies back then still had some rough edges because they simply didn't know any better.
I have mixed feelings about the scene; I thought that the performances were fantastic and it had me on the edge of my seat throughout, even though I couldn't help but react to the nature of the insult lobbed at Walken's character and the way in which it was conveyed, which, to today's me felt a bit much. I understand why the scene was done the way it was but, as you said, it would probably not be written that way today. 90s me would have had a very different opinion, though (it was definitely a different time, as you also said).

In principle I agree with you that storytelling should be about exploring the human condition, warts and all (I pretty much agree with the whole paragraph above), but these days I guess I'm more sensitive to certain aspects of said condition (which can be argued is for the better, all things considered).


Yeah, he wasn't great, and it not being directed by Tarantino probably hurt the tone and performances overall because he just has such a unique voice that people didn't fully know then. Scott probably did as well as possible though, as evidenced by the infamous aforementioned scene above.

Agreed!

 

Griffith

My posts are better.
Before watching the movie, I had no idea what a grindhouse movie was but, if this one is representative of the genre, then the genre is not for me. :shrug:

Same. I give them credit for spurring this sub-genre of faux-grindhouse movies, or really popularizing the idea at all. I think before we just thought of them as low budget, trashy movies, which yes, can be quite appealing. Ironically, but of course less so if you're trying to be bad on purpose.

I have mixed feelings about the scene; I thought that the performances were fantastic and it had me on the edge of my seat throughout, even though I couldn't help but react to the nature of the insult lobbed at Walken's character and the way in which it was conveyed, which, to today's me felt a bit much. I understand why the scene was done the way it was but, as you said, it would probably not be written that way today. 90s me would have had a very different opinion, though (it was definitely a different time, as you also said).

Agreed, if you're at all attuned to modern sensibilities you're going to have a certain extra level of awareness watching this scene that will take you out of it, even though it's still clear what Hopper is doing and why. Now, that discomfort level could and should be experienced back then too, as intended, but as we said it just plays differently now, especially in an era where the fiction you right is supposed to say something about what you believe, for better or worse. In that way Tarantino is a nice relic of a different school of filmmaking, and he's been pretty consistent in his stance on this sort of material right on through Django and Hateful Eight. So, he definitely believes in having the characters talk the way he thinks they would talk regardless of how it might be perceived.

In principle I agree with you that storytelling should be about exploring the human condition, warts and all (I pretty much agree with the whole paragraph above), but these days I guess I'm more sensitive to certain aspects of said condition (which can be argued is for the better, all things considered).

Yeah, the phenomenon is worth exploring unto itself. Also, there's fortunately no shortage of media platforms now to explore every aspect of the human condition creatively by every sort of person behind the camera, which I think is the upside here. Hopefully, we'll also still have Tarantino around a while longer to provide material that tests some of these new storytelling notions against what's now sort of the traditionalist way. Eventually the avant garde becomes the old guard.
 
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