Is there a color'd way to read the books

I would love to read the book's in color hell I would pay double per volume for it if they officially re made it in color. , or at the very least a Sin City style where some thing's are colored but some stuff is black and white ( would help to have blood as red.)
 

Walter

Administrator
Staff member
Purchase Adobe Photoshop.
Open Photoshop.
Open all digital files of Berserk.
Create batch process.
Step 1: image / mode: RGB.
Step 2: image / adjust / Change Hue/Saturation.
Step 3: Click Colorize. Raise saturation bar to maximum. Hit Okay.
Save the batch process.
Execute on all opened files.
Enjoy.
 
I love how succinct you are lol :ubik:

I sometimes wish that they were more colorized pictures in the manga. When ever Miura bothers to color them it is simply gorgeous, and it is done is a way that does not sacrifice the rich detail of the artwork. One thing that I constantly salivate over his the realistic shadowing and attention he puts into the smallest details in his work that other mangakas might fudge or stylized to get the general idea of the detail across. Even while looking at Japanese raw panels of Berserk I find myself just getting lost in the pictures. Other mangakas when they do bother to color sometimes make the character designs look too different from their black and white designs and I find that jarring. Miura keeps it consistent. And I like the color pallet he chooses when he does color it, I especially like when he uses muted (almost washed out) color. To me for the tone of the story it seems to fit. When fans decide to color the black and white pictures sometimes they go for these flamboyant bright colors and it looks so at odds with the art style. Some do this. not all.
 

Walter

Administrator
Staff member
I remember when I first started reading manga [Akira was my first, Gunnm shortly afterward], the strict black+white nature of the medium bothered me. I had come directly from American comics, where color is a matter of course. But these days, after reading Berserk for over a decade, I don't think I'd prefer it even if it were an option. It's a very pure medium. Also, sort of like reading a book and imagining the world between the descriptions, or the pixelated graphics in older games, the lack of explicit information helps you form the remaining part of the world in your head. That extra legwork on the readers' part invites immersion.
 

Aazealh

そうはいかぬ
Staff member
Vixen Comics said:
I sometimes wish that they were more colorized pictures in the manga. When ever Miura bothers to color them it is simply gorgeous, and it is done is a way that does not sacrifice the rich detail of the artwork.
It's not like Miura "colorizes" the pictures. The color pages are painted, their creation follows a different process.
 
Walter said:
I remember when I first started reading manga [Akira was my first, Gunnm shortly afterward], the strict black+white nature of the medium bothered me. I had come directly from American comics, where color is a matter of course. But these days, after reading Berserk for over a decade, I don't think I'd prefer it even if it were an option. It's a very pure medium. Also, sort of like reading a book and imagining the world between the descriptions, or the pixelated graphics in older games, the lack of explicit information helps you form the remaining part of the world in your head. That extra legwork on the readers' part invites immersion.
**raises hand** major DC comic book gal over here! I understand your feelings on the difference between the American graphic novel and the Japanese kind. I too was a little put out at first by the art style and lack of color in them. But even though I enjoy the American graphic novels there is something I sort of dislike about the modern day versions of it. I can't put my finger on it but there is something off putting about it that makes me like earlier art work from the 90's and before that. But I am something of a stickler to how my art looks and if they screw it up, it bothers me. I am the same with animation as well. I feel that it is part of the enjoyment to see animation come to life and make me believe in the world. I was very turned off initially by Bruce Timm's super stylized character designs of the animated batman series from the 90's in season four. I hated the simplified character designs. I can go on and on about this topic of art work and animation but mostly I have a deep appreciation for the nitty gritty hand drawn art in manga vs. American colorized graphic novel. You are right it is a very pure form and I like that about Berserk and the detail he puts into it. That is why I am not quite so bothered by the amount of time he puts into his art. I notice a lot of fans get annoyed by the amount of time he takes to get episodes out. (It is my understanding he does a lot of the art work himself rather than delegating it to his assistants)

Aazealh said:
It's not like Miura "colorizes" the pictures. The color pages are painted, their creation follows a different process.
So Miura himself does not do the coloring of his pictures? I was unaware of that. Does Miura have control on what pictures gets colored or does someone else decide that?
 

jackson_hurley

even the horses are cut in half!
Vixen Comics said:
So Miura himself does not do the coloring of his pictures? I was unaware of that. Does Miura have control on what pictures gets colored or does someone else decide that?
No he does color them but the ones that are colored are paintings. Not done the same way as just a regular black and white page.

For me, I have always been a fan of b/w panel. I do my own artwork in b/w for I suck at coloring. I want to put some of my illustrations on color and I did with one of my silkscreen print and it looked great for a newbie with color. haha I have a plan at some point to scan my favorite berserk panels and big them up a bit then print them in silkscreen and put them on my wall. I might do an exhibit/homage to berserk (not selling the prints of course, just want to share Miura's great artwork with people and maybe get them to read the series if they like it) My way to show that it's my favorite series.
 

Aazealh

そうはいかぬ
Staff member
Vixen Comics said:
So Miura himself does not do the coloring of his pictures? I was unaware of that. Does Miura have control on what pictures gets colored or does someone else decide that?
You didn't understand me properly. These pictures aren't colored in the sense that they aren't black and white ink drawings that were then "colored" using whatever means. Miura paints them on canvas. The process is entirely different and it's misguiding to refer to it as "coloring".
 
I've never read comics or manga that had colored pictures, so it isn't something I miss.

Walter said:
Also, sort of like reading a book and imagining the world between the descriptions, or the pixelated graphics in older games, the lack of explicit information helps you form the remaining part of the world in your head. That extra legwork on the readers' part invites immersion.
Very true! When the reader is left some space for their own imagination to play, it can make for some of the most vivid mental images.

Vixen Comics said:
Other mangakas when they do bother to color sometimes make the character designs look too different from their black and white designs and I find that jarring. Miura keeps it consistent. And I like the color pallet he chooses when he does color it, I especially like when he uses muted (almost washed out) color. To me for the tone of the story it seems to fit.
I like that about Miura's color works, too. They're like these awesome extra glimpses you get into the world of Berserk. :guts: Really neat!
 
Walter said:
I remember when I first started reading manga [Akira was my first, Gunnm shortly afterward], the strict black+white nature of the medium bothered me. I had come directly from American comics, where color is a matter of course. But these days, after reading Berserk for over a decade, I don't think I'd prefer it even if it were an option. It's a very pure medium. Also, sort of like reading a book and imagining the world between the descriptions, or the pixelated graphics in older games, the lack of explicit information helps you form the remaining part of the world in your head. That extra legwork on the readers' part invites immersion.
I also think the stark black-and-white adds to the dark fantasy/horror atmosphere that Miura is going for - its like how film noir films are nearly always better in black-and-white.
 
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